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100th NCSS Annual Conference

Preliminary Program

Saturday, December 5, 2020
11:00am - 11:30am
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 3) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Engage and reflect so that you can more effectively support the LGBTQ students in your own classroom through a study of relevant research and a discussion of model resources, ideas, and strategies.
Zachariah Lowe
(Global Studies 1) [Global Studies]
By 2050, the planet will need to increase its food production by 70%. Explore how insects as an alternative food source can save the planet.
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 3) [Curriculum and Instr]
Explore how DC social studies teachers have leveraged blended learning tools to transform their classrooms into self-paced, mastery-based environments. Gain practical expertise to create your own sustainable, data-driven modern classroom.
(NCGE-1) [Geography]
Explore creating a skills-based K-8 GeoLiteracy curriculum using the Virginia Geographic Alliance Floor Maps, State Atlas, and online GIS. This BYOD session is standards-based and hands-on. Bring white socks!- Anne M. Evans, Virginia Geographic Alliance, University of Richmond, VA; Georgeanne Hribar, Virginia Geographic Alliance Old Dominion University, Richmond, VA
Anne M. Evans
Georgeanne Hribar
(NCSS-Psychology) [Psychology]
Discover what's new with AP Psychology with the College Board Course Lead. Share your ideas for maximizing equity, inquiry, and success for all students.
(NCSS-Elementary 3) [Elementary]
How are we bringing social studies back to elementary schools? Explore how DC Public Schools has leveraged policy, curriculum, PD, and advocacy to shift mindsets and reinstate elementary social studies.
Scott Abbott
Anthony Hiller
Jayson Wilkinson
Lindsay McCrea
Alison Williams
(NCSS-Elementary 2) [Elementary]
Using the Six Proven Practices for Effective Civic Learning, discover how to find resources and create project-based assessments to promote the civic literacy of students.
Kadie Patterson
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 2) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Experience first hand the power of art to amplify silenced voices, foster agency, build classroom community, and create a more equitable social studies classroom.
Lauren Bagwell
Jonathan Tunstall
(NCSS-Economics) [Economics]
Educators have been teaching monetary policy the same way for decades. However, the Fed’s monetary policy framework has changed. Learn the content and discover new teaching strategies and resources.
Scott Wolla
Jane Ihrig
(NCSS-US History 2) [US History]
Discover methods to incorporate African American female voices in American History lessons. Textbook-centered courses silence minority voices and contributions. Learn ways to ensure equitable representation.
Karalyn McGrorty Derstine
Jennifer Guarnaccia
(NCSS-Civics/Government 2) [Civics/Government]
Vaping, homelessness, recycling, and school safety are local government issues that engage students. Connect local leaders, issues, policies and students with teacher-tested lessons that prepare kids for civic life.
(NCSS-Civics/Government 1) [Civics/Government]
Help middle school students become active citizens with contemporary examples through a webinar. Receive a lesson plan with relevant case studies of citizen action and a Google Drive link with classroom resources.
Catherine Jones-Gray
(NCSS-Literacy) [Literacy]
Learn how to increase student literacy skills by developing engaging vocabulary lessons that incorporate roots and affixes across different content areas.
(NCSS-Elementary 1) [Elementary]
Explore how to use vivid and engaging picture books about historical and current event issues to teach tough social studies topics, foster empathy, ignite curiosity, and inspire action.
Jinnie Spiegler
Jill Eisenberg
(NCGE-2) [Geography]
Learn about how to collaborate and share lessons through this member powered database.
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 1) [Curriculum and Instr]
Hear about one teacher educator's mission to challenge teacher candidates' understanding of history while uncovering myth and misconception using the C3 Framework and the Inquiry Design Model.
Karla Ontiveros- Karr
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 2) [Curriculum and Instr]
Take shelter with us as we explore effective issues-centered teaching in this neverending socio-political hurricane, including responding in real time to unexpected partisan tornados.
Emma Humphries
Karalee Nakatsuka
Shannon Salter Burghardt
Jenifer Hitchcock
(NCSS-Technology 1) [Technology]
Learn how to integrate virtual reality into your teaching of World War I via case studies from teachers, using their inquiry design model and downloadable resources. Watch demonstrations of activities directly from practicing teachers, including first person views of the virtual experience.
Todd Ogle
David Hicks
Jessica Ratcliffe
Jennifer Bonds
(NCSS-World History) [World History]
Examine historical evidence (text and visual) of antisemitism to understand the origins and history of the "longest hatred"
Andrew Askuvich
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 4) [Curriculum and Instr]
Discover spatial justice within the social studies. Learn how educators and students may focus the relations of places, spaces, and lived experiences within social studies.
Kaitlin Popielarz
Timothy Monreal
(NCGE-4) [Geography]
Indigenous place names contain traditional knowledge, world view, and information related to spirituality and culture. Non-natives can better understand and respect Indigenous cultures by studying what the names reveal. Handouts.- Betsy Arntzen, Canadian-American Center, University of Maine, Orono, ME
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 1) [Cross-Disciplinary]
The election season may be over, but teachable moments continue long after the vote. Engage students through games, lessons, and activities that put them in the middle of the action.
Carrie Ray-Hill
11:00am - 11:45am
(ABA-NLRE 4) [US History]
Explore how Arkansas teachers have given voice to the unheard stories of school integration across the state. Learn about the presenters' research techniques, lesson development, and resulting projects.
Melissa Starkey
Cassandra Barnett
(NCSS-Civics/Government 3) [Civics/Government]
How do we ensure that our students are not merely learning trivial information about civics? In this interactive panel discussion, hear from experienced iCivics teachers about meaningful Civics curriculum.
Ed Finney
Peter Paccone
Jennifer Jolley
Nathan McAlister
(NCSS-US History 3) [US History]
Explore how to teach historical controversies over Confederate monuments. Focus on three public controversies—in 1890, 1995, and 2015—regarding Confederate monuments in one Southern city.
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 5) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Join five award-winning authors as they discuss the latest nonfiction books for kids that include stories and perspectives that have long been left out of the history books.
Sarah Albee
Marcie Flinchum Atkins
Leah Henderson
Carole Lindstrom
Patricia Tanumihardja
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 4) [Cross-Disciplinary]
It's a fast-paced sharing of resources. Volunteers contribute to share a tool, tip, or resource with the group about teaching and learning. Leave with a collaborative document of 50+ resources!
Melissa Seideman
Rebecca Stephens
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 5) [Curriculum and Instr]
Illinois High School District 214 does more than just teach law. The district has constructed courtrooms, involved local professionals, and created a college-aligned law curriculum that brings legal studies alive.
Michael McCabe
Rita Thompson
Jonathon Kaminsky
Cecilia Garcia
Alex Diesbergen
Jodi Blazek
Rebecca Mulligan
Jay Heilman
(ABA-NLRE 2) [Civics/Government]
2020 is an election year and the 150th anniversary of the 15th Amendment, making it a vital time to consider the history of voting rights in the United States.
Ursula Wolfe-Rocca
(ABA-NLRE 1) [Law/Law-Related]
Discover the benefits of diverse juries and the obstacles to achieve them, through exploration of a jury study and role-playing. This works well for all using mock trials.
Margaret Fisher
(ABA-NLRE 3) [Civics/Government]
2020 Census results are on their way to government officials. Engage in timely lessons on U.S. population growth since 1790 and how this impacts the workings of our democracy today.
Peter Bailey
Pamela Wasserman
(NCSS-US History 4) [US History]
Analyze women's suffrage primary resources from pre-colonial to modern day, to learn how to empower students, critically engage them, and develop a theory of social change.
11:00am - 12:00pm
(Sponsored Session 1) [US History]
(Sponsored Session 1) [US History]
Historic artifacts are souvenirs from another time that can trigger our collective memory and help us relive history.  Join Sally Flaherty, national social studies expert, as she shows you how historical objects and primary sources can share their own witness of history and help your students better understand the people, events, and stories that shaped our nation and our world. 
Sally Flaherty
(NCGE-5) [Geography]
Join your colleagues as we engage in robust discussion around Geo-tech in the classroom.
(Sponsored Session 2) [US History]
Kyle VanderWall, APUSH teacher and co-author of the Teacher's Edition for Fabric of Nation, presents you with methods for incorporating content and skills into your lessons such that students develop an understanding of history as both a subject and discipline. Too often, AP students compartmentalize these concepts and thus leave APUSH with a less nuanced understanding of what they are studying. Kyle offers strategies for weaving skills with content as you teach Reconstruction--a topic we're all facing soon. Each participant will leave the session with a sample lesson and materials to teach the content of Reconstruction through disciplinary skills.
Kyle VanderWall
11:30am - 12:00pm
(NCGE-4) [Geography]
Gain insights on contemporary challenges Canada faces because of climate change in the Arctic. Territorial disputes, natural resource conflicts, Indigenous rights and human security topics highlighted with teaching resources.- Amy Sotherden, Center for the Study of Canada, SUNY Plattsburgh, NY
(NCGE-1) [Geography]
Engage your students in the amazing adventure of learning about the geography of the United States through Mystery Skypes as they collaborate with students in different states across the nation!- Mary C. Hanna, New Canaan Public Schools, New Canaan, CT; Regan Lamberson, Frenship ISD, Wolfforth, TX
Mary C. Hanna
Regan Lamberson
(NCGE-3) [Geography]
Explore activities focused on Nat Geo’s "Out of Eden Walk" that utilize concepts learned in AP Human Geography that can serve as a bridge to material in AP World History.- Ali Hendrick, Dutch Fork High School, Irno, SC; Jerry T. Mitchell, Michael Mewborne, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC
Ali Hendrick
Jerry Mitchell
(NCGE-2) [Geography]
Boreal is a simulation which examines tree harvesting practices in the Boreal Forest over two generations. Students use the simulation to harvest trees using current logging practices within the context of profitability and sustainability.- Randy Wilkie, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, ON
11:35am - 12:05pm
(NCSS-Global Studies 1) [Global Studies]
How do you fight an idea? Osama bin Laden was killed in 2011, and yet his radical message persists. Grapple with this ongoing challenge in its historical and geographical context.
Clifford Chanin
(NCSS-Elementary 1) [Elementary]
The editorial director of Scholastic News will reveal the secrets of writing news articles—and demonstrate how you can use those secrets to teach media literacy skills to young learners.
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 2) [Cross-Disciplinary]
What do Gil Scott-Heron, Bikini Kill, and Beyoncé have in common? Explore the connections between music and race that can extend beyond February.
Andy Mink
Mike Williams
Rhonda Watton
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 2) [Curriculum and Instr]
Whether online or face-to-face, discover how to make meaningful connections between current events and your curriculum by exploring strategies for navigating difficult topics, partisan politics, and breaking news with ready-to-use teaching resources.
(NCSS-Economics) [Economics]
Discover how six economic principles can deepen historical understanding. Solve the mystery: Why did the colonists fight the mighty British when they were safe, prosperous, and free?
Mark Schug
Tawni Ferrarini
Scott Niederjohn
(NCSS-Technology 1) [Technology]
Boost students' inquiry and critical thinking skills using promising transferable practices developed in a school/museum pilot program on Ethnic Studies.
Ashley Naranjo
Philippa Rappoport
(Curriculum & Instruction 6) [Curriculum and Instr]
A century since Carter G. Woodson’s 1926 introduction of "Negro History Week," most school-based curriculum in America continue to scrape the surface of the study of Black people’s contribution to United States history or approach the topic as an addendum. This presentation will demonstrate how to effectively shift the study of Black history from an outlier to the center of the narrative of the history of America.
(NCSS-US History 2) [US History]
Explore and consider a digital timeline of historic moments when the words of the Declaration of Independence have been invoked in the pursuit of the self-evident truth that all men are created equal throughout American and world history. Engage in a facilitated dialogue with other educators and get resources for distance learning.
(NCSS-Civics/Government 2) [Civics/Government]
Explore the executive branch and the powers of the president using resources from the New-York Historical Society’s collections, and consider how civic education can be enhanced by primary source analysis. Explore strategies for incorporating primary sources, focusing on free digital resources designed for remote and in-person learning.
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 4) [Curriculum and Instr]
Educators of Native students must use language and inquiry to shift the narrative of their curriculum. Examine and create curriculum centered on Native peoples’ experiences using a question framework.
Meadow Wiggington
Shawn Ralston
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 3) [Curriculum and Instr]
The question that brings us together is "How can we design meaningful blended learning experiences for students in social studies?" In this interactive presentation we share practices, challenges, and successes.
Craig Perrier
Jenifer Hitchcock
Allison Kline
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 3) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Combatting misinformation that is readily available to students is a challenge in classrooms today. Explore strategies for addressing conspiracy theories that translate across a variety of content and subjects.
Noah Rauch
Megan Jones
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 1) [Curriculum and Instr]
Explore the Inquiry Design Model and how it can be implemented in history classes using the example of the Election of 1860. Appropriate for both middle and secondary levels.
Elizabeth Barrow
(NCSS-US History 1) [US History]
Develop a year-long research project to promote historical thinking skills such as document analysis, contextualization, experiential learning (in person or virtual), and continuity and change over time while simultaneously developing research and writing skills.
Sarah Fischer
Rochelle Edwards
James Coe
(NCSS-Literacy) [Literacy]
Examine primary sources used in Candace Fleming’s research, such as Amelia Earhart's report card, and mine them for details to write a brief story for sharing. Practice the historian's art!
Jennifer Paulsen
Candace Fleming
(NCSS-World History) [World History]
Explore the context of the Cold War and Decolonization to understand the Korean War through a series of free, open source instructional materials that draw on primary sources.
Gregory Ahlquist
Patrick Whelan
Tom Sakole
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 1) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Rediscover primary sources by using an incredibly versatile source: the U.S. Federal Census! Receive lesson plans and inspiration for igniting a passion for primary sources and inquiry in your students.
(NCSS-Civics/Government 1) [Civics/Government]
Discover a framework for teachers and students to identify their own agency and create action plans for change based on examples of ordinary citizens who accomplished extraordinary change.
Heather Hagan
Carolyn Weber
(NCSS-Psychology) [Psychology]
Learn to incorporate peer-reviewed research articles into the classroom to improve thinking skills and the ability to utilize the scientific method. The material is suitable for any social studies course.
(NCSS-Elementary 2) [Elementary]
Consider criteria on selecting developmentally appropriate children's literature and plan read alouds that invite K-3 learners to explore the question, “Who cares about the environment?”
Valerie Walker
12:00pm - 12:30pm
(NCGE-2) [Geography]
See your name in print! Have you ever considered publishing your geography lesson idea or research project? The editors of The Geography Teacher and the Journal of Geography invite you to learn more about the publication process for both journals and how you can become a successful author.- Meredith Marsh, Lindenwood University, St. Louis, MO; Rebecca Theobold, University of Colorado Colorado Springs, CO
Meredith Marsh
Rebecca Theobold
12:00pm - 12:50pm
(NCGE-2) [Geography]
Examine the functionality of MY AP in your AP Human Geography classroom. Interact with MY AP with a special focus on Unit 3, Cultural Patterns and Processes, in order to learn how to connect the five APHG skills with required content by using various tools and platforms within MY AP.- Valerie Mervine, Landstown High School, Virginia Beach, VA
Valerie Mervine
(NCGE-5) [Geography]
Learn how OpenStreetMapping collects data for humanitarian organizations which helps create maps to help people in communities around the world. Students can help others around the world with OSM.- Celeste A. Reynolds, Mashpee High School, Mashpee, MA; Steven Johnson, The George Washington University, Washington, DC
Celeste A. Reynolds
Steven Johnson
Discover how OpenStreetMap geographic data is used by humanitarian organizations globally. Learn how to incorporate OSM work in your classroom empowering your students to assist others around the world!
Celeste Reynolds
Steven Johnson
(NCGE-1) [Geography]
Go beyond covered wagons and pioneers to teach historically accurate and balanced units on Western Expansion. Learn curriculum from global and Indigenous educators that can help reframe our approach.- Kyla M. Sweet, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA
12:00pm - 1:00pm
(NCGE-4) [Geography]
Join your colleagues as we explore how geography and social justice intertwine.
12:30pm - 1:00pm
(NCGE-6) [Geography]
Examining contemporary geopolitics in Northeast Asia requires applying both geographical and historical perspectives to the region. Territorial and taxonomy issues continue to get in the way of peaceful and harmonious relationships in the region.- Joseph P. Stoltman, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI
1:00pm - 1:30pm
(NCSS-Economics) [Economics]
Prepare your students for their financial future by engaging them in financial decision making by using localized data related to your community.
Kolleen Madeck
Sarah Gutierrez
(NCSS-Sociology) [Sociology]
Discover ACEs (Adverse Childhood Experiences), and learn how ACEs affect learner performance in school. Explore strategies on coaching students through difficult obstacles. Participate in a virtual workshop that will utilize aspects of shared screens, chat, Q&A, microphones and breakout rooms.
(NCSS-Civics/Government 1) [Civics/Government]
Teach your students to confront discrimination using lessons and experiences from contemporary Germany. Receive free inquiry-based materials, including a global collaboration component, which can be adapted to your subject.
Don Jenkins
Jenny Windell
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 1) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Explore visual literacy and visual thinking skills. Experience four visual thinking skills activities. Brainstorm ways visual thinking skills activities can inspire inquiry at all grade levels.
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 3) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Using these eight easy steps, create your own quality assessment items that will bring you the data you need to push your students to the next level.
Kadie Patterson
(NCSS-Elementary 1) [Elementary]
Explore why even "good" readers can have difficulty comprehending social studies text. Discuss key elements that make the text challenging and get specific strategies to help students navigate the text.
Jennifer Altieri
(NCSS-US History 1) [US History]
Explore more than a dozen different historical examples of reparations—from cash payments to land settlements to state apologies—in a session about how we address past injustice.
Ursula Wolfe-Rocca
(NCSS-Global Studies 1) [Global Studies]
Receive access to a collection of online instructional resources created by educators from over 15 countries that prioritize inquiry-oriented learning experiences across social studies disciplines to advance global learning.
Brad Maguth
Gloria Wu
(NCSS-Elementary 3) [Elementary]
Excite students with opportunities to interact with age-appropriate primary sources to grow a culture of inquiry. Create a thinking classroom, whether virtual or face-to-face, where students work as young historians.
Steve Beasley
Lisa Wellborn
Sherry Owens
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 3) [Curriculum and Instr]
Learn more about strategies that create classrooms rich in active student participation and interaction using a variety of resources such as images, texts, video, and digital interactives.
Geoff Howard
Juan Cabrera
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 2) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Examine different methods of reading, writing, and reflection to create an environmentally conscious classroom. Learn about materials attendees can use immediately in their classrooms.
Matthew Hollstein
Bethany Vosburg-Bluem
Jay Shuttlesworth
(NCSS-World History) [World History]
Discover how to teach and learn from comic-style biographies (from one-pagers to lengthy graphic histories) to support student understanding and claim-testing of global narratives.
(NCSS-Civics/Government 2) [Civics/Government]
Explore the RFK Human Rights' Speak Truth To Power lessons to develop engaging strategies for students in classroom content as well as the values inherent in Human Rights Education. Explore the resources available on the STTP platform and hear about their impact from the students who experience them.
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 4) [Curriculum and Instr]
Explore how to teach about religion applying a First Amendment best-practices framework that fosters religious pluralism and civil society by analyzing controversial, politically charged topics about world religions in classroom dilemmas.
Gayle Pagnoni
LaChardra McBride
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 2) [Curriculum and Instr]
Explore American History through case studies developed by the Harvard Business School. Whether in a virtual or live classroom, this innovative approach to history engages students while honing their argumentative writing and oral communication skills. Using case studies to address social justice will also be a focus.
Daniel McMains
Genny Allard
Erica Golle
Alex Kaufman
(NCSS-Elementary 2) [Elementary]
Explore a culturally competent classroom through the eyes of its students. Learn how teachers can connect SEL skills and global themes, while fostering empathy and inclusivity in young learners.
(NCSS-Technology 1) [Technology]
No time or money for field trips? No problem! Take your students across place and time using virtual reality. With the Google Expeditions app, conduct social studies virtual field trips
Geraldine Stevens
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 1) [Curriculum and Instr]
Explore how primary sources can help illuminate the Native American experience as we honor and celebrate those who serve with the opening of the new National Native American Veterans Memorial.
Cheryl Hughes
Cynthia Stout
(NCSS-US History 2) [US History]
Examine how women of diverse backgrounds contributed to, and were shaped by, an era of escalating political activism and rapidly shifting social norms using classroom-ready primary sources. Explore strategies for incorporating primary sources and focus on free digital resources designed for remote and in-person learning.
1:00pm - 1:45pm
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 6) [Curriculum and Instr]
Teach students how to utilize primary and secondary sources to step into historical character via a Living History project. Benefits include stronger research and public speaking skills and a deeper understanding of the past.
Abigail Cline
Heather Nice
(NCSS-US History 3) [US History]
Legislatively required to assess historical thinking, Maryland developed the Evidence-Based Argument Set—a hybrid of the DBQ and the Historical Assessments of Thinking from the Stanford History Education Group.
BRUCE LESH
Leah Renzi
(ABA-NLRE 2) [Law/Law-Related]
Youth creating change! Don't wait until your students can vote. Teach your middle school students how to make a meaningful and sustaining difference in our democracy today.
Laura Wesley
Gregorio Medina
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 4) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Delve into new World Area Book Award titles from Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, and Asia. Read selections and gather ideas for using them in the classroom.
Susan Douglass
Emera Bridger
Karen Kane
Brenda Randolph
(NCSS-Literacy) [Literacy]
Explore how historical comics contributed to Yellow Journalism, the “fake news” of the early 20th century. Work with historic primary sources to build media literacy skills in your classroom.
Keith Patterson
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 5) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Explore strategies for using audiovisual testimony to connect past and present-day events in the classroom, both traditionally and virtually, with USC Shoah Foundation’s award-winning educational website, IWitness, and a veteran social studies educator.
(US History 4) [US History]
Elevate your teaching of World War II using the digital media collection from PBS LearningMedia. Lessons on propaganda, women, and young people feature hundreds of original artifacts to highlight diverse perspectives.
India Meissel
Sue Wilkins
Christian Scott
(NCSS-Civics/Government 3) [Civics/Government]
Breathe life into your teaching of landmark Supreme Court cases with inquiry-based primary source activities.
Cathy Ruffing
Tammy Waller
(ABA-NLRE 3) [Law/Law-Related]
Take a quick look back at the blockbuster 2019-20 term before diving into one of the teachable cases from this term. Receive online teaching materials.
Lee Arbetman
Cathy Ruffing
(ABA-NLRE 4) [Civics/Government]
Develop your toolkit on teaching Canadian comparative government through 30+ K-12 teaching resources, and understand why Canada is ranked as the world’s 7th most democractic country in the Democracy Index.
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 5) [Curriculum and Instr]
You can do that?! Learn how teachers and teens alike used content from a new Smithsonian exhibit to create digital educational resources for other teachers and teens, and how they adjusted their plans in the midst of a global pandemic.
Eden Cho
Teya Green
Caitlin Haynes
Alison Leithner
Ashley Naranjo
Christopher Overbeck
(ABA-NLRE 1) [Law/Law-Related]
Discover tools and lesson plans designed to engage students in explorations of world constitutions. Participate in a demo and leave with five lessons to use or adapt in your classroom!
Zachary Elkins
JoEllen Ambrose
(NCSS-Technology 2) [Technology]
Imagine a live or virtual class with 100% participation, with students engaged in critical inquiry, excited about learning, and empowered to participate. Learn how technology and Nearpod’s interactive features transformed my students' learning. See how the platform allowed for a seamless transition to virtual learning.
1:00pm - 1:50pm
(NCGE-4) [Geography]
Use inquiry to help students understand how geography influences genocide. Receive resources and activities for classroom use.
Aaron Johnson
Lisa Pennington
(NCGE-2) [Geography]
Learn how the AEROKATS and ROVER Education Network (AREN) Project can be used to introduce NASA technologies and practices while concurrently advancing student research projects investigating Earth science related phenomena.
(NCGE-5) [Geography]
Learn about the effective development of Powerful Geography to create a bottom-up, student-centered, inclusive curriculum for K-12 geography education.- Dick Boehm, Joann Zadrozny, Michael Solem, Thomas Larsen, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX
(NCGE-1) [Geography]
Set sail on an exploration into effective geography instruction. Discover and experience new teaching methods to introduce geography into your curriculum. All treasure materials will be provided.
1:00pm - 2:00pm
(Sponsored Session 1)
Freedom Rider Joan Trumpauer Mulholland will share her most important lessons from the civil rights movement and how students can help change their world today.  Live Q&A with Joan will follow.  Bring your questions and prepare for a once-in-a-lifetime experience.
Joan Trumpauer Mulholland
(NCGE-3) [Geography]
<br><br>Liliana Monk, Lisa Benton-Short, The George Washington University, Washington, DC
(Sponsored Session 2) [Geography]
Wondering how to teach students to respond to the new type of Free Response question on the AP Human Geography Exam? The presenters will guide you through a practice FRQ and give you the tools to use in the classroom. These presenters are authors of a brand new forthcoming APHG textbook, and each participant will receive a hard copy, shipped to school or home. The book will help you teach content and includes a ton of practice exam questions.
Barbara Hildebrant
Max Lu
Kenneth Keller
1:35pm - 2:05pm
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 1) [Curriculum and Instr]
From stereotypical mascots to paper headdresses, American schools can perpetuate myths about Native Americans. Learn how teachers can be Indigenous allies and changemakers in their classrooms and schools.
(NCSS-Technology 1) [Technology]
It’s 2020! Are we harnessing technology tools at the highest SAMR Scale levels? Join Two Geeky Teachers and explore 10 tools utilizing primary sources to modify and redefine your instruction.
Michelle Pearson
Laura Israelsen
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 3) [Curriculum and Instr]
Want to introduce or review a unit, challenge students' information and problem solving skills, and provide a collaborative and engaging environment for everyone involved? It's easy – BREAK OUT!
(NCSS-US History 2) [US History]
Explore women’s integral role in the formation and evolution of colonial American societies in this interactive session. Use primary sources to consider diverse women’s experiences. Explore strategies for incorporating primary sources and focus on free digital resources designed for remote and in-person learning.
Mia Nagawiecki
(NCSS-Civics/Government 2) [Civics/Government]
Connect your students with their peers across the country for online civil dialogues about relevant constitutional questions to promote civic knowledge and SEL skills with classroom exchanges.
(NCSS-Global Studies 1) [Global Studies]
Build students’ global civic literacy in ways that are meaningful, relevant, and student-centered, drawing on resources from Pre-AP and World101 from the Council on Foreign Relations.
Charles Hopkins
Drew McCulley
(NCSS-Economics) [Economics]
Do you ever wish your students understood real world expenses? Fin Lit, the financial literacy game, will help YOU to accomplish this task!
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 2) [Curriculum and Instr]
Help all students virtually, including introverts, develop the confidence to use their voice to speak out on issues that interest them. Learn Ford's Theatre Oratory Skills and technology to aid this.
Lindsey Charron
(NCSS-US History 1) [US History]
Explore how Colonial Williamsburg educators use primary sources to create character experiences that bring to life the stories of people who seldom appear in written records of our nation's past.
Henry "Andy" Engel
Nicole Brown
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 4) [Curriculum and Instr]
Participate in activities to become familiar with Arab Americans, their history, and civic engagement in the U.S. This session provides information and testimonies from Arab American women educators.
Ilham Nasser
Jihan Andoni
wahiba Derouaze
(NCSS-Elementary 2) [Elementary]
Engage students with space history, exploration, and exciting new future missions. From the moon to Mars, explore digital primary sources, diverse women in space, and virtual interdisciplinary resources and curriculum connections related to space studies.
(NCSS-Civics/Government 1) [Civics/Government]
Explore free inquiry-based lessons designed to facilitate democracy education and prepare students for civic life by comparing and contrasting the United States and German governments.
Thomas Sorosiak
Wood Powell
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 2) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Discover how students, imagining themselves as national park employees in a story about the endangered mountain gorillas, decide to take action to confront climate change. An inquiry approach guides learning.
Margit McGuire
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 3) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Engage with USC Shoah Foundation's award-winning educational website, IWitness, to discover classroom-ready, testimony-based resources that cultivate empathy in students through storytelling across the curriculum.
(NCSS-World History) [World History]
Learn how World History Project teachers use hands-on activities, vocabulary assessments, quizzes, writing assignments (and more!) to push assessment beyond just tests. Did we mention that WHP resources are totally free?
Anne Koschmider
Ane Lintvedt
Julie Horowitz
(NCSS-Elementary 1) [Elementary]
Discover the connections between critical literacy and the C3 Framework. Explore ways to purposefully use trade books to introduce and develop civic dispositions in pre-K through grade 5.
Laura Darolia
Carly Muetterties
(NCSS-Elementary 3) [Elementary]
Learn a step-by-step process for using visuals to unlock understanding, anchor historical memory, and implement Visual Discovery in your classroom.
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 1) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Explore the legacy and lessons of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre through the digital inquiry projects of nearly 200 civically engaged Oklahoma secondary students.
Shanedra Nowell
Shelbie Witte
Kalianne Neumann
1:50pm - 2:20pm
(NLRE 2) [Civics/Government]
Discover the origins and global context of the Bill of Rights. Two online interactive resources will empower teachers and their students to critically analyze constitutional rights through primary source analysis.
(NLRE 3) [Law/Law-Related]
Discover how Street Law's Legal Life Skills Program can empower students with the practical legal knowledge and civic skills needed to combat inequality, participate effectively in their communities, and succeed as adults.
Yolanda Johnson
Jazmine Donerson
(NLRE 1) [Civics/Government]
Explore engaging opportunities to use the "Rule of Law" as the springboard for instruction. The Center for Teaching the Rule of Law will demonstrate the use of our free resources.
3:30pm - 4:00pm
(NCGE-1) [Geography]
Experience hands-on lessons about shared borders and Canada’s population, language, and economics. Though significantly linked by physical and human geography, our largest bi-lateral trading partner often receives little instructional focus.- Jennifer M. Dawson, Lost Mountain Middle School, Kennesaw, GA
(NCGE-4) [Geography]
Advocate for geography's place in the K-12 curriculum by articulating its value for preparing diverse learners to face society's current and future challenges.- Kelly León, Sweetwater Union High School District, Chula Vista, CA; Thomas Herman, California Geographic Alliance, San Diego, CA
(NCGE-3) [Geography]
Obtain tools to help your AP students review and prep for course content and for their AP exams in FIVE AP social studies course areas. Discover the functionality using our suite of apps.- Greg Sherwin, iScore5, Lincolnshire, IL; Kenneth H. Keller, iScore5, Marietta, GA
(NCGE-5) [Geography]
Using online mapping tools to reach students everyday.
4:00pm - 4:30pm
[World History]
Using two interactive World History lessons, learn new approaches for reaching and teaching ELLs and all students. Strategies include visuals, graphic organizers, primary sources, and simulations. Exciting resources distributed.
Michelle Both
Miranda Ferguson

Games, experiments, and simulations are an important part of teaching economics. This session will feature resources and tips to help you facilitate active learning... even in a virtual classroom.

(Economics) [Economics]
Games, experiments, and simulations are an important part of teaching economics. This session will feature resources and tips to help you facilitate active learning... even in a virtual classroom.
Kenneth Leonard
Debra Henney
(NCSS-Global Studies 1) [Global Studies]
From travel bans to eliminating DACA, misleading rhetoric creates an atmosphere of exclusion and misunderstanding. Challenge popular myths about immigration through poetry and stories that reveal the harsh realities that immigrants face.
Kimberly Kanof
Camila Arze Torres Goitia
(NCSS-Civics/Government 1) [Civics/Government]
Game-based learning is a fun and engaging way to reach ALL students (including ELLs). Explore iCivics games and intentional scaffolds for students navigating the complex academic vocabulary of civics.
Kristen Chapron
(NCSS-Civics/Government 2) [Civics/Government]
Your students can learn about the Constitution. Participate in Civil Civic Conversation. Use their talents to earn scholarship or money. Constituting America brings all this to your classroom for FREE.
(US History 2) [US History]
As the United States grew and became more diverse from our founding to today, so too did the census work force that counted the American people. This presentation will highlight several diverse census takers and employees while situating their stories within the history of the Census Bureau and our country.
Aundrea Wilkins
Victoria Glasier
(NCSS-Elementary 2) [Elementary]
Examine theoretical and practical issues of diversity in classroom settings, especially related to race. Explore materials and develop lessons that counteract stereotypes and incorporate histories and contributions of all cultures.
Micha Jeffries
Drinda Benge
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 1) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Engage with Ph.D. candidate Signe Thomas as she virtually presents a mini high school seminar (designed to be presented in-person or virtually), sponsored by the Foundation for Economic Education, through lectures and interactive games on economics and government.
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 2) [Curriculum and Instr]
Inquiry activates curiosity and inspires meaningful questions. Explore interweaving inquiry-based learning strategies throughout all content areas, whether through face-to-face, hybrid, or distance learning instruction. Learn how to utilize both virtual and hands-on interactive activities and view shared student work.
(NCSS-US History 1) [US History]
Experience history as told by journalists from the Revolutionary War to the Women's March with a new interactive website from PBS NewsHour based on a treasure trove of primary sources.
Victoria Pasquantonio
Greg Timmons
Liz Ramos
Syd Golston
(NCSS-Literacy) [Literacy]
Unpack the concept of news media bias and learn a nuanced approach for teaching it. Discover strategies for turning students’ perceptions of bias into authentic opportunities for inquiry and action.
(NCGE-1) [Geography]
<br><br>
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 5) [Curriculum and Instr]
Learn strategies to advance inquiry, understanding and engagement, maximizing the synergistic integration of primary sources, multi-media and text, differentiating to make instruction accessible for all learners. Receive ready-to-use lessons.
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 3) [Curriculum and Instr]
Explore how students can use Wikipedia, Fox News, and MSNBC to form their own ideas. Quarantine learning only underscores the need to develop online source evaluation skills. Learn a three-step process, with practical class materials, to get from facing a question to forming a historical argument.
Rabiya Kassam-Clay
(NCSS-Elementary 1) [Elementary]
Explore resources to teach about extraordinary women in history using award-winning children’s literature and primary sources such as photographs, documents, and videos.
Michelle Bauml
Elizabeth Bellows
Debbie Morowski
Sherry Field
(Curriculum & Instruction 6) [Curriculum and Instr]
You’ve likely listened to TED Talks before. But what if you had the opportunity to create and record your own TED Talk? Through this hands-on session, learn how you can use the TED Masterclass app to create your own talk – all through the use of your mobile device. The first 200 attendees to join us will receive a FREE TED Masterclass license, with the opportunity to share their talk at future conferences and educator gatherings. Don’t miss out on this excellent professional development opportunity!
(NCGE-2) [Geography]
Explore the movement of 6 million African Americans, one family at a time. Fear was palpable in the American South, and violence was a constant threat. How does this grassroots movement affect the way Americans still live today?- Jennifer Bray, Providence Day School, Charlotte, NC
(NCSS-Technology 1) [Technology]
Discover the power of storytelling using Google Earth. Every story has a place. Learn how students can explore and connect to their world (even during remote learning) while deepening their understanding of storytelling.
Kim Randall
Josh Williams
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 3) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Black girls who consider themselves "Afrocentric" have higher self-esteem and academic achievement. The Roots Project is a personal inquiry project where Black girls explore their family, community, and cultural origins.
Tamika Williams
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 4) [Curriculum and Instr]
Inspire students to be civil communicators with Common Sense's free Digital Citizenship Curriculum. Leave with classroom resources and pedagogical approaches to help students thrive in today’s interconnected world.
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 1) [Curriculum and Instr]
Apply the steps of a Structured Academic Controversy and the Google Suite to foster classroom inquiry, collaboration, and discussion, and ultimately improve student claim and counterclaim writing on any topic.
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 2) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Is student social media use impacting the classroom? Explore the limits of free speech to deepen student understanding and empower the effective use of First Amendment rights.
Jessi Hollis McCarthy
Barbara McCormack
4:00pm - 4:45pm
(ABA-NLRE 2) [US History]
Consider suffrage’s aftermath in this interactive session exploring how diverse American women worked to secure and exercise their rights in the wake of the 19th Amendment. Discover strategies for incorporating primary sources and focus on free digital resources designed for remote and in-person learning.
Mia Nagawiecki
(NCSS-Technology 2) [Technology]
Join other technology enthusiasts by sharing your favorite tech tools. Learn what technology is being implemented in classrooms around the country. Leave with a list of shared resources.
Brian Bechard
Ed Finney
Ilene Berson
Michael Berson
(NCSS-Civics/Government 3) [Civics/Government]
Grapple with the complexities of the 14th Amendment's promise of "Equal Protection" in modeled activities exploring the history, changing interpretations, and modern debates pertaining to this pivotal constitutional provision.
Kerry Sautner
Mike Adams
Trish Everett
Lauren LeBato
(ABA-NLRE 3) [Law/Law-Related]
Take a deep-dive into a current hot-button Supreme Court case that serves as a framework for exploring contemporary constitutional questions.
(Cross-Disciplinary 5) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Online educational marketplaces have seen major growth, but concerns about the quality of resources, particularly related to issues of racism and social justice, abound. Drawing on our study of best-selling history resources on TeachersPayTeachers.com, we offer recommendations for teachers who wish to buy or sell resources on these sites.
Lauren Harris
Leanna Archambault
Catharyn Shelton
(NCSS-Psychology) [Psychology]
Explore options for psychology skills-based instruction and resources in a synchronous video session. Receive and contribute ideas to lessons and student resources via Google Docs so that all students can improve their lives by applying psychological principles.
(NCSS-US History 3) [US History]
Participate in a role play that explores the history and evolution of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and the broader Civil Rights Movement through debate and discussion.
(ABA-NLRE 4) [Law/Law-Related]
Examine evolving definitions of “genocide” since World War II in international law and public discourse, using powerful comparative twentieth-century case studies, such as the Nazi, Armenian, Cambodian, and Bosnian genocides. Opportunities for discussion and materials download will be available virtually and on-demand.
Tiffany Middleton
Tiffany Middleton
(ABA-NLRE 1) [Civics/Government]
A good way to learn about Rosa Parks and the NAACP establishing freedom of association is to play the roles of Supreme Court justices applying the 14th amendment to three cases, including NAACP v Alabama.
Jada Kohlmeier
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 4) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Learn how to "issue-ize" your existing instructional units in social studies by applying an issues-centered focus to increase student engagement, understanding, and responsibility.
Mark Previte
Ronald Evans
Kim Koeppen
Scott Wylie
Jay Shuttleworth
Kelli Hutt
4:00pm - 4:50pm
(NCGE-3) [Geography]
Understand better the key concepts of the Course and Exam Description (CED) through this interactive presentation that grounds many of these unit concepts in examples from Washington, D.C. Key concepts discussed include gentrification, food deserts, new urbanism, segregation and inequity, sustainable urban planning, and edge cities.- Liliana Monk, Lisa Benton-Short, The George Washington University, Washington, DC
(NCGE-4) [Geography]
Help students think critically about the ethical considerations of land use, resource use and their environmental impacts on habitats and communities in this hands-on session.- Anita Lewis, Clear Creek ISD, League City, TX
4:00pm - 5:00pm
(NCGE-2) [Geography]
This presentation is focused on inquiry-based learning experiences with mapping and graphing tools in FieldScope to support students in asking questions with real-world data, visualizing and interpreting the data, and answering questions about their world.- Audrey Mohan, Lindsey Mohan, Sean O'Connor BSCS Science Learning, Colorado Springs, CO
Audrey Mohan
Lindsey Mohan
Sean O'Connnor
(Sponsored Session 1)
Facilitating constructive and instructive discussions about historical and current racism in America is more important now than ever. Explore Confronting Racism: Case Studies and Conversations on African American History, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt’s new digital, student-centered curriculum that dives into these topics in a structured and sensitive way. 
David Lawson
Andrew Miles
(NCGE-6)
Discover your inner explorer and dig into the relationship between biodiversity, trash, and civic responsibility while participating in a service-learning project with National Geographic Educators and Explorers.
Kimberly Waite
Jessica Lura
4:30pm - 5:00pm
(NCGE-2) [Geography]
Use free inquiry-based lessons, digital resources, and maps to investigate the social, political and economic consequences of German division and reunification, drawing connections to other borders around the world.
Jessica Ellison
(NCGE-1) [Geography]
Excite students by integrating maps, drones, Play-doh, and Legos to form the basis of a geographic inquiry project. Students then suggest improvements to a local park, based on their inquiry.- Cynthia Bloom, Michigan Geographic Alliance, Kalamazoo, MI
4:30pm - 5:15pm
(NCSS-Global Studies 2) [Global Studies]
4:35pm - 5:05pm
(NCSS-Technology 1) [Technology]
Develop active learning strategies with geographical data suitable for remote learning through the GeoFRED portal from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
Diego Mendez-Carbajo
(NCSS-World History) [World History]
Tensions along the DMZ stem from multiple factors that have not been resolved. Explore the history of the Korean War focusing on the DMZ through multiple sources and student-centered lessons.
Craig Wood
Michelle Penyy
Matthew Britton
(NCSS-Elementary 2) [Elementary]
Content-rich text is a must, but teachers often struggle to make it accessible. Through practice and pedagogy, experience and discovery, uncover ways to make text digestible for all students.
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 3) [Curriculum and Instr]
Join the birthday bash and get 100 sparks to inspire. Choose what interests you! Process what you are learning. Go away with "gifts" to use next week.
Michelle Cude
Ashley Jaffee
Alicen Brown
Melissa Davenport
(NCSS-Literacy) [Literacy]
Discover the pedagogy, methodology, and materials for teaching students to reflect on their own thinking through inquiry-based media decoding that also teaches core social studies content. Receive tips for doing this work through async and sync online tools.
(Curriculum & Instruction 6) [Curriculum and Instr]
Anti-racist social studies education is finally having its moment - but many teachers worry about the potential for trauma teaching people's histories may open up. How do we bring these important, but potentially triggering conversations and topics into our classes? How do we create authentic social studies courses that are proactive in their approach to trauma informed teaching?
Adina Goldstein
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 2) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Empower your students to take control of their social media feeds with news literacy. Learn the best methods for educating students on how misinformation spreads on their feeds.
Jake Lloyd
John Silva
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 1) [Cross-Disciplinary]
New to DBQs? Let us introduce you to DBQuest, iCivics’ primary source analysis tool! Then step behind the curtain as we discuss the thinking and skills needed to help students answer DBQs.
Taylor Davis
Carrie Ray-Hill
(NCSS-Civics/Government 1) [Civics/Government]
Make the AP Government curriculum come alive with the most engaging and memorable video clips for each specific unit of study in the redesigned course.
Jennifer Bouchard
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 2) [Curriculum and Instr]
Hit play and bring diverse global voices into your classroom. Learn about public broadcasters and audio productions that bring students historical and cultural stories from a new perspective.
(NCSS-Economics) [Economics]
Find and explore engaging resources that will allow you to bring personal finance into your classroom in 10 minutes or less!
Laura Matchett
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 1) [Curriculum and Instr]
Want to enliven your classes with structured discussions? Supreme Court cases are a great way to address historical moments and current controversial issues. Virtually explore resources and ideas for incorporating them.
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 4) [Curriculum and Instr]
Explore how Arkansas educators are promoting informed action and civic engagement through the use of object-based learning in K-12 classrooms. Learn engaging techniques, and receive project ideas and resources.
Melissa Starkey
Cassandra Barnett
Kathleen Pate
(NCSS-Civics/Government 2) [Civics/Government]
Discover how Vote Smart provides free, factual, unbiased information on politicians to ALL Americans. National Director Walker McKusick will demonstrate the research questions that any citizen should ask their candidates.
Walker McKusick
(NCSS-Elementary 1) [Elementary]
2019 saw the 100th anniversary of women’s right to vote. Such anniversaries disregarded the experiences of women of color. Learn how to reinsert diverse women into the curriculum using picturebooks. Receive a book list and get live previews of the text.
Noreen Rodriguez
Amanda Vickery
4:45pm - 5:30pm
(ABA-NLRE 1) [Curriculum and Instr]
Explore how to create a culture of human rights education in a city through both curriculum and standards, using Washington, DC, as a case study.
Rachel Bergsieker
Karen Hopkins
Shelina Warren
Jessica Sutter
Rosemary Blanchard
(ABA-NLRE 2) [Civics/Government]
5:00pm - 5:30pm
(NCGE-4) [Geography]
Challenge temporal-only views of the new Latinx South and explore primary source resources (oral histories, documents, pictures) that educators might use to create inquiry units/lessons about the topic.- Timothy Monreal, California State University, Bakersfield, CA
(NCGE-3) [Geography]
Engage elementary students in inquiry of the spatial world while improving their economic understanding. Experience C3 standards-aligned lesson plans that you can take back to your classroom.- Eui-Kyung Shin, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL; Mary Beth Henning, University of Mount Union, Alliance, OH
(NCGE-5) [Geography]
Explore how students can take civic action using Geo-Technology around the world. This session will empower you with tools using vulnerable communities in the Middle East as an example.- Celeste A. Reynolds, Mashpee High School, Mashpee, MA; Greg Hill, Horn High School, Mesquite, TX
(NCGE-2) [Geography]
See how to build spatial thinking and field knowledge using a Hurricane Harvey case study with teacher candidates. Discuss adaptations and localization for use in kindergarten through college.- Anne A. Perry, University of Houston, TX
Sunday, December 6, 2020
11:00am - 11:30am
(NCGE-2) [Geography]
Learn how to move beyond the textbook and labeling maps to making geography content engaging and meaningful using a variety of teaching strategies.- Jane Purcell, Norman Public Schools, Norman, OK; Kelly Glos, Lewisville ISD, Lewisville, TX; Parisa Maymand, Saint Norbert College, De Pere, WI; Whitney Walker, Lafayette High School, Lexington, KY
Jane Purcell
Kelly Glos
Parisa Maymand
Whitney Walker
(NCGE-1) [Geography]
Get resources to teach environment and water resources. Explore hands-on activities using models and interactive technology devices. Learn about the educational effects on student Eco-attitudes and Eco-affinity.- Sojung Huh, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX
(NCSS-Elementary 1) [Elementary]
Explore how to meaningfully integrate social studies in a K-5 classroom utilizing student-led/teacher-facilitated strategies (e.g., discussions, visible thinking routines, thinking dispositions, etc.) that are rigorous and engaging.
Phylisha Sanders
Lori Carlin
Justyn Knox Burgess
Thomas Daugherty
(NCGE-5) [Geography]
National Geographic’s MapMaker Interactive amplifies geographic literacy through mapping and data analysis. We intend this GIS tool to increase student knowledge about geographic interconnections and to help educators prepare the next generation of youth to be active, engaged citizens.- Anita M. Palmer, Esri, Austin, TX, Bruno Gabrielli, Sarah Appleton, National Geographic Society, Washington, DC
11:00am - 12:00pm
(NCGE-4) [Geography]
<br><br>Valerie Mervine, Landstown High School, Virginia Beach, VA
11:15am - 11:45am
(NCSS-Global Studies 1) [Global Studies]
Investigate the Armenian Genocide through the testimony of Aurora Mardiganian. Her story illuminates the first genocide of the modern era and creates connections to immigration, women’s rights, and political activism.
(NCSS-US History 1) [US History]
Animate your instruction with relevance and rigor. Inspire students to think like historians, explore Critical Race Theory, and encounter local history by planning Document-Based units.
(NCSS-Technology 1) [Technology]
Join Two Geeks for a Digital Scavenger Hunt! Try GooseChase, discovering architectural and historical features from various primary source virtual locations! Explore this tool in a remote learning setting and model possibilities of use in remote or hybrid learning. Return to claim prizes and create an engaging hunt for yourself!
Laura Israelsen
Michelle Pearson
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 2) [Curriculum and Instr]
Discover how to ignite students' passion for history. Learn how to combine the idea of genius hour with content, and structure it for success. Using a digital platform allows us to "see" and "hear" how History Choice Projects can be accomplished in both traditional classroom and distance learning settings.
(NCSS-US History 2) [US History]
Learn ways to engage students in authentic historical inquiry through the use of primary sources and emerging technologies.
Scott Waring
Irenea Walker
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 2) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Explore how students exercised their voice through passion projects. Learn how students selected problems, researched the topics using Newsela, and developed and implemented plans to solve them.
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 1) [Curriculum and Instr]
Improve learning outcomes for ELLs by identifying key content and translating vital vocabulary. Explore two proven frameworks to make adapting abstract texts simple and effective. Learn and employ these frameworks virtually in a practical application.
Sante Mastriana
(NCSS-Civics/Government 2) [Civics/Government]
Explore how to engage students in recognizing media bias in online media headlines using examples from the impeachment battle and other events.
(NCSS-Psychology) [Psychology]
Improve students' retrieval with active, engaging review activities for psychology and AP Psychology. From breakout boxes to test corrections, participate and share ideas for helping students remember what they've learned!
Michael Berndt
Amy Fineburg
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 1) [Cross-Disciplinary]
One hundred years after the Nineteenth Amendment, women's voices are still silenced by history. How can we uncover the hidden curriculum in our classrooms and include more female voices?
Haley Hewitt
Cassandra Montalto
(NCSS-Civics/Government 1) [Civics/Government]
Want to increase student involvement on Election Day? Join us to explore the design and impact of the Boston Public Schools’ Student Election Poll Worker program, running three years strong.
(Curriculum & Instruction 3)
(Curriculum & Instruction 3) [Curriculum and Instr]
Learn more about ways to take initiative to bring the conversation of race in the classroom and ways to make your classroom more inclusive. Interact with different resources that you can use in your school or district while working with different teachers. Hear about what students feel are most beneficial when discussing race in the classroom coming directly from a student!
(NCSS-Elementary 2) [Elementary]
Learn how to integrate the Teaching Tolerance K-5 Hard History Framework and the Inquiry Design Model. Explore sample critical inquiries.
Vicki Hobson
Rachel Petri
John Hobson
Shelby Matthews
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 4) [Curriculum and Instr]
Explore how Universal Design Learning allows students to choose their own path to learning material in your class, tracking their progress and creating assessments through the use of different technology.
(NCSS-World History) [World History]
Memorials represent what societies want to believe about their own histories, and are compelling sources of inquiry for students into collective memory, historical wrongs, and marginalized perspectives.
11:15am - 12:00pm
(ABA-NLRE 4) [Cross-Disciplinary]
What do Americans mean when they expect newcomers to "assimilate" into American life? Explore the word's problematic meaning from the first enslaved Africans to Chinese laborers to immigrants arriving today.
Ting-Yi Oei
Ana LuoCai
(NCSS-Economics) [Economics]
Learn economic concepts related to the environment using fun, in-class activities. Use these concepts, along with up-to-the-minute sources, to think about how to best solve current environmental problems.
Stephen Day
Eeman Salem
(ABA-NLRE 2) [Civics/Government]
On December 14, 2020, electors from the states and D.C. will select the next president. Explore controversies, critiques, and challenges regarding the Electoral College system. Receive classroom-ready activities.
Benjamin Wellenreiter
(Literacy) [Literacy]

Join Lee & Low Books authors Katheryn Russell-Brown, Guadalupe García McCall, Kyle Lukoff, Supriya Kelkar and moderator, Senior Literacy Specialist, Katie Potter, as they converse about equity and inclusion in books for young readers. Each author will discuss their process for writing about topics that address social justice and how books can convey critical issues to young readers about society.

(Literacy) [Literacy]
Join Lee & Low Books authors Katheryn Russell-Brown, Guadalupe García McCall, Kyle Lukoff, Supriya Kelkar and moderator, Senior Literacy Specialist, Katie Potter, as they converse about equity and inclusion in books for young readers. Each author will discuss their process for writing about topics that address social justice and how books can convey critical issues to young readers about society.
Katheryn Russell-Brown
Guadalupe Garcia McCall
Kyle Lukoff
Supriya Kelkar
(ABA-NLRE 1) [Civics/Government]
Elevate the discussion of civics and contemporary issues using legal sources (including landmark Supreme Court civil rights cases) as teaching tools to explore ethics, equity, and social justice in K-12 classrooms.
Robert Kim
Elizabeth Kleinrock
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 4) [Cross-Disciplinary]
The rise of five 20th century dictators sheds light on democracy’s mortality. Engage with content, sources, and strategies to help shape complex conversations about Strongmen and our collective civic responsibilities.
Jessica Ellison
Kenneth C. Davis
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 5) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Explore the question, “What does it take to make inquiry possible in social studies?” by viewing and discussing a documentary on the inquiry ecosystem in a Kentucky school system.
Kathy Swan
S.G. Grant
John Lee
Ryan Crowley
Gerry Swan
Callaway Stivers
Gates Sweeney
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 5) [Curriculum and Instr]
The proliferation of online video sharing platforms holds great potential for history teacher professional development. Explore methods for using these platforms to support teacher learning about historical inquiry. Practice commenting on a video of classroom instruction and debriefing the experience with facilitators.
Abby Reisman
Melissa Viola-Askey
Aaron Cebular
Laura Shaw
Matt McDonald
Madison Kantzer
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 6) [Curriculum and Instr]
Learn how university, museum, and K-12 educators from four Texas school districts are partnering to transform the teaching of Mexican American and Latino Studies in Texas and across the country.
Philippa Rappoport
David Colon
Maritza De La Trinidad
Francisco Guajardo
Chris Milk Bonilla
Lilliana Saldana
(NCSS-Civics/Government 3) [Civics/Government]
Engage in primary and secondary source analysis and civil dialogue about two challenging constitutional provisions: the 2nd Amendment and the 4th Amendment. Take classroom-ready materials back to your students.
Kerry Sautner
David Olson
(NCSS-Technology 2) [Technology]
Hear a panel of leaders in the digital media industry and expert university faculty discuss the importance of teaching and supporting digital civic engagement in our classrooms and schools.
Nick Lawrence
Ilene Berson
Michael Berson
(NCSS-Literacy) [Literacy]
How do middle school students read and learn from primary and secondary sources? Explore how the adolescent brain works through teachers' use of an inquiry journey in U.S. history.
(ABA-NLRE 3) [Law/Law-Related]
Virtually convene youth and police to discuss and examine controversial law-enforcement topics that directly impact the lives of officers and the young people they serve in their communities.
Gregorio Medina
Laura Wesley
11:15am - 12:15pm
(Sponsored Session 1) [Curriculum and Instr]
Educators and students across the world are ready for more productive dialogue and critical thinking that leads to real problem solving as we learn about the complex, critical issues of our times.  Doha Debates hosts discussions on the world’s most pressing challenges to bridge differences, build consensus and identify solutions. For educators we offer a comprehensive guide to develop the skills and knowledge needed to significantly raise the quality of discourse possible in our classrooms (virtual or face to face), as well as inspire students to take action for real change. This interactive workshop will explore how systems thinking, inclusion of diverse world views and evolved communication skills really can improve learning outcomes while equipping the next generation with the competencies they need to thrive in these challenging times.
Jennifer Geist
(Sponsored Session 2) [Economics]
How can research take financial education to the next level? This session will discuss what research tells us about effective financial education and research-based strategies to make financial education more effective for students. We will discuss the gaps in current approaches to financial education and introduce a new comprehensive, research-based curriculum called finEDge developed at the University of Chicago Financial Education Initiative. Participants will leave with strategies and resources to better affect knowledge, attitudes, and behavior change in students.
Jenn Hockema
Rebecca Maxcy
11:30am - 12:00pm
(NCGE-1) [Geography]
How can we help all students cultivate the curiosity of an explorer? Join us on a virtual expedition with real-life explorers and learn strategies for engaging students in Geo-inquiry.- Sarah Westbrook, Right Question Institute, Cambridge, MA; Fay Gore, National Geographic Society
(NCGE-2) [Geography]
Excite, engage and challenge your students through pop and traditional visual media for teaching various geographic content and skills. Discover hands-on activities and discussion strategies. Receive materials.- Gary M. Gress, The University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK
11:30am - 12:30pm
(NCGE-5) [Geography]
Learn how to create an authentic local geospatial inquiry using ArcGIS Online. See three sample activities and learn learn how to adapt them or build your own.- Kate Popejoy, Thomas C. Hammond, Environmental Literacy and Inquiry Writing Group at Lehigh University, Lehigh, PA
11:50am - 12:20pm
(NCSS-World History) [World History]
Introduce, expand on, and engage students in making connections between World War II and the Holocaust and relevant contemporary issues, using the story and artwork of a young survivor as well as online interactive and collaborative activities.
Claire Tesh
Bernice Steinhardt
(NCSS-US History 1) [US History]
Identify whole-class discussion strategies that will help students develop historical thinking skills across the course of an entire school year.
Jennifer Johnson
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 1) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Consider the possibilities of place-based learning in your own context(s) while you hear from preservice teachers about their experiences learning about history, archaeology, and social studies curriculum at Montpelier.
Emma Thacker
Aaron Bodle
(NCSS-Technology 1) [Technology]
Honor hometown heroes. Join VA's Veterans Legacy Program and experience how technology brings veteran biographies into the classroom, inviting students to celebrate a local legacy and national heritage.
Bryce Carpenter
Amy Giroux
Kenneth Holliday
(NCSS-US History 2) [US History]
Analyze compelling primary sources and conflicting viewpoints to enrich the understanding of historical context. Engage your students in exploring real world challenges through the eyes of the people who lived them.
Sherry Levitt
Cynthia Szwajkowski
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 4) [Curriculum and Instr]
Learn a doable approach to utilizing formative assessment to “feed forward” student progress. Experience strategies designed to close gaps in student knowledge for both remote and face-to-face instruction.
Steve Beasley
Sherry Owens
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 2) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Addressing the climate crisis has more to do with politics than science. Yet climate change still hasn't found its place in social studies. Learn how to teach about climate-related issues in the high school classroom from an organization building the first semester-length social studies course for high schools.
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 3) [Curriculum and Instr]
Learn Gilder Lehrman Teaching Literacy Through History strategies and Eduprotocols to utilize with primary sources and nonfiction pieces that engage students with disciplinary thinking, utilizing websites such as Peardeck and Edji.
Lindsey Charron
Nathan McAlister
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 2) [Curriculum and Instr]
Culturally Responsive Teaching (CRT) develops the cognitive capacity of students from diverse backgrounds. Discover the tools and strategies to promote CRT in social studies classrooms across your school or district.
Shanti Elangovan
Cereescia Sandoval
(NCSS-Elementary 2) [Elementary]
How can students use primary sources to encounter histories of communities of color and women's civil strife? Use the Journey Box to discuss ways to build historical inquiry with students.
Katherina Payne
Erin Green
Melissa Rojas Williams
(NCSS-Psychology) [Psychology]
Craving something new for your motivation unit? Want to connect with the athletes in your class? Walk away with a fun sports psychology unit including research, activities, and inquiry lesson.
Leah Everson Greene
(NCSS-Elementary 1) [Elementary]
Discover motivational lessons to encourage social and emotional learning in the classroom while addressing current events around the global environment, resource use and human well-being.
Lindsey Bailey
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 1) [Curriculum and Instr]
Social-emotional learning is just as important as academic learning. Explore how to seamlessly integrate SEL strategies into your instructional practices. Examine an array of ready-to-use ideas and resources. Engage in meaningful tasks to apply the learning to your particular context.
(NCSS-Civics/Government 2) [Civics/Government]
FRONTLINE offers an unflinching and compelling look at complex, vital and often controversial subjects. Discover free FRONTLINE educational resources and hear lesson ideas for thought-provoking learning experiences.
Carolyn Jacobs
Emily Stacy
(NCSS-Global Studies 1) [Global Studies]
Gain insight into the history of Central America, including U.S. involvement, that has led to mass migration to the United States. Classroom-friendly lesson on key figures in history and literature.
Deborah Menkart
1:00pm - 1:30pm
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 4) [Curriculum and Instr]
Discover ways to explicitly incorporate the Earth into social studies. Learn how to use visual thinking strategies (VTS) to (re)visualize and value the environment with your students.
(NCSS-Civics/Government 2) [Civics/Government]
Wondering how to assess Taking Informed Action? Youth Voice Showcases provide authentic opportunities to assess student skills, knowledge, and dispositions; connect classroom to community; and celebrate youth civic engagement, even through remote learning.
Jill Bass
Karen Lee
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 1) [Curriculum and Instr]
Explore how an inquiry into housing demographics broadened student understandings about the politics of race and about current social justice issues as students vlogged their personal growth through the process.
Molly Schneider
Amy Myers
Beth Walsh-Moorman
(NCSS-Psychology) [Psychology]
Delve into the power of the human voice with StoryCorps and the research behind why humans bond through storytelling. Guide your students through recording and analyzing interviews, while also developing social-emotional learning.
(NCSS-Civics/Government 1) [Civics/Government]
Learn about effective and policy-based civic action that is your students' voice and power for creating positive and sustainable change in their communities and world.
Gregorio Medina
Laura Wesley
(NCSS-Elementary 2) [Elementary]
Elementary students need to see themselves reflected in social studies. Learn strategies to be intentional and culturally relevant in social studies instruction by using primary sources and amplifying student voice.
Jessica Ellison
Angela Bianco
(NCSS-World History) [World History]
World War I shaped the modern Middle East. Let's move beyond Western-centered political-diplomatic history to see the war's social impact through diaries, memoirs, and photos by Middle Eastern residents. -
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 1) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Connect students to China’s rich history and the diversity of its arts and cultures as educators from the Smithsonian, Brooklyn Museum, and Madeira School present new, standards-based cross-disciplinary resources.
Elizabeth K. Eder
Jennifer Reifsteck
Michael Reback
Matthew Sudnik
(NCSS-Technology 1) [Technology]
Demonstrate best practices for creating podcasts in the classroom. Share audio recording and editing tools, hear examples of podcasts made by other teachers, and learn best practices for podcast lessons.
Nick Capodice
Hannah McCarthy
(NCSS-Economics) [Economics]
Tired of tacking on a project to the end of a unit? Make Economics come alive by implementing a project-based assessment in which students apply economic concepts to their lives.
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 2) [Curriculum and Instr]
As the world changes faster than we can ever imagine, teachers must equip students with the ability to think on their feet, process new information, and ask great questions.
(NCSS-Literacy) [Literacy]
Infographics offer structure and design to concepts when students have a hard time seeing the big picture. Build student knowledge of essential civics topics using infographics as your blueprint.
Molly Launceford
(NCSS-Elementary 1) [Elementary]
Engage in powerful, yet simple thinking routines to strengthen elementary students’ ability to read, evaluate, connect, question, and collaborate when examining primary sources. Receive teaching and search guides.
Amy Wilkinson
Cheryl Best
(NCSS-US History 2) [US History]
Explore how the ideals articulated by the American Revolution—liberty, equality, civic responsibility and natural and civil rights—have influenced the social movements of the past 100 years.
Evan Phifer
Stacia Smith
(NCSS-Global Studies 1) [Global Studies]
The Syrian Civil War and resulting refugee crisis is a defining humanitarian issue of our time. How did colonialism, sectarianism, and the Arab Spring impact Syria? Choices Program curriculum provided.
(NCSS-US History 1) [US History]
Determine if the civil rights movement was successul by virtully examining the desegregation of New Orleans public schools over the past 60 years. Learn more about public education in the process.
Connie Schaffer
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 3) [Curriculum and Instr]
Technology meets social issues! Explore the tech tools that help students research multiple perspectives, discuss diverse viewpoints, and present informed opinions.
Kelli Hutt
Scott Wylie
Mark Previte
Jay Shuttleworth
Ronald Evans
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 2) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Embrace student agency when engaging with humanitarian issues—both locally and globally—through appreciating their voice and empowerment in your teaching. Explore case studies and an inquiry-based learning activity.
Amanda McCorkindale
1:00pm - 1:45pm
(NCSS-Civics/Government 3) [Civics/Government]
Learn about the processes for developing a course centered on issues of diversity and social justice, and explore best practices for engaging students on matters of equity, diversity, and advocacy.
Efrain Marimon
Jacqueline Saylor
Ashley Patterson
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 6) [Curriculum and Instr]
Learn how to integrate WIDA Language Development Standards (2020 Edition) into social studies units and lessons; and use language development to heighten multilingual learner [ELL] access to content learning.
Lynn Shafer Willner
Elizabeth Warren
(NCSS-Elementary 3) [Elementary]
Discover how Rangers with the National Park Service use the principles of inquiry-based learning in education programs focused on elementary and middle school students.
Leslie Smith Duss
Rachel Talbert
Dr. Maia Sheppard
Jennifer Epstein
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 4) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Learn how the Big History Project’s focus on interdisciplinarity, skill-building, and inquiry make it the perfect resource for rounding out the C3 Inquiry Arc in your 6-8th grade classroom.
Todd Nussen
Hajra Saeed
Judith Jeremie
(ABA-NLRE 3) [Civics/Government]
Analyze the Constitution and its impact on today's political issues using visual resources. Discuss strategies to incorporate graphic novels into the civics curriculum to engage students.
Kristen Luby
Tim Smyth
Cynthia Levinson
(NCSS-Technology 2) [Technology]
The NCSS Technology Community pulled together the best tech resources that were shared throughout the 2020 conference. Leave with a list of resources from the session.
Brian Bechard
Nick Lawrence
Ed Finney
Kori Green
(ABA-NLRE 2) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Discover how to better facilitate classroom discussions about injustices highlighted in curriculum, including historical events, literature, and current events.
Stephanie Tellis
(ABA-NLRE 4) [US History]
Engage students through informed discussions about the history of women's struggle for the right to vote, with media resources drawn from AMERICAN EXPERIENCE | "The Vote" and PBS LearningMedia.
Sue Wilkins
Karen Pleasant
(NCSS-US History 3) [US History]
Rethink the civil rights movement by participating in a role play that uses an iconic moment, but shifts the focus from those on the stage to those in the streets.
Adam Sanchez
Jessica Lovaas
(NCSS-US History 4) [US History]
Integrate the multi-racial narrative of An African American and Latinx History of the United States with visual primary sources from the Library of Congress.
Antoinette Rochester
Tina Heafner
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 5) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Identify, value, and apply human rights practices within social studies education using “The Human Rights Game,” underpinned by the principles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
Kristi Rudelius-Palmer
Andi Chorney
Glenn Mitoma
Hugh Kingsley
Hannah Portogallo
Jacob Skrzypiec
John Terry
(ABA-NLRE2) [Law/Law-Related]
Americans’ health and healthcare options are the products of history. We focus on four crises: 1918 influenza; polio; HIV-AIDS; COVID-19; including citizens’ & governments’ responses; medical/public health, economic, individual & behavioral, nutrition, education, neighborhood, and environmental factors; legacies of inequality; and disproportionate effects on low-income, communities of color.
Robert Eager
Stephanie Narrow Narrow
Michael Sabin Sabin
Sandra Line
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 5) [Curriculum and Instr]
Explore three different activity structures with materials and scaffolds for engaging upper elementary and middle school students in critical visual inquiry using Library of Congress documents.
1:00pm - 1:50pm
(NCGE-3) [Geography]
Learn how to use a variety of technological tools to teach multiple interdisciplinary content standards in the context of the Berlin Airlift. Online classroom resources will be shared.- Jeffrey Hall, Lucy Bush, Mercer University, Atlanta, GA
(NCGE-4) [Geography]
Explore the geography and history of the anti-lynching campaign in the U.S. Discuss recent efforts to memorialize the legacy of lynching at the national and local level. Receive classroom materials.- Todd Kenreich, Towson University, Towson, MD
(NCGE-2) [Geography]
Much potential exists to incorporate the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) into Human and Physical Geography courses by adopting a pedagogy which includes campus / community action. Including such outreach efforts in course design, and aligning these efforts to the SDGs, allow students to develop an appreciation for their own potential and power while expanding their worldview, geographic knowledge base, AND challenging global stereotypes of development and progress. This Engage & Connect presentation includes review of an instructional design template together with three lesson plans focusing on Plastics, Trees, and Food, Though developed for higher education, there is great potential to apply in all education levels.- Tracy L. Edwards, Frostburg State University, Frostburg, MD
1:35pm - 2:05pm
(NCSS-Literacy) [Literacy]
Learn how the simple literacy strategy of annotated reading, used across content areas, can support struggling students, increase engagement and support the efforts of ELA.
Corrine Lancaster
Jonathon Nunn
(NCSS-Civics/Government 2) [Civics/Government]
The panel will address the evolving nature of civics education in the United States as the discipline has grown to encompass and connect with broader youth development. Participants in the panel will discuss the potential of these more holistic, competency-focused, approaches to civics education—distinguished here as citizenship education—to transform students’ understandings of how they can participate in civic society, even when they are not yet eligible to vote. With America at a crossroads, panelists will offer insights into how educators can leverage citizenship education to support student self-efficacy, empowering them to discover the confidence and skills they need to shape the world around them.
Ali Berry
Scott Warren
Karalee Wong Nakatsuka
Michael Neagle
(NCSS-US History 2) [US History]
Discover how to employ the latest in education technology applications to have students create their own virtual museum exhibits, both in the classroom and in distance learning.
Peter Miele
Kara Boehne-Miele
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 2) [Cross-Disciplinary]
Learn about an inquiry-based curriculum that challenges students to share their own ideas for improving the lives of families around the world.
Kelsey Tyrrell
Morgan Day
Keegan Kautzky
(NCSS-Economics) [Economics]
Learn to use five ready-to-go interactive lessons. Students engage economics, personal finance, and history on the economics of globalization and automation and its impacts on their future careers.
Tamra Carl
Mary Clare Peate
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 3) [Curriculum and Instr]
Learn to use powerful Web tools in your classroom. See for yourself how powerful Web tools can inspire students with cutting edge presentations, create engaging assessments, help check for understanding, and support organization with an online notebook.
(NCSS-Civics/Government 1) [Civics/Government]
Explore American Constitutional Principles with a framework for understanding American civic life that can be embedded in the culture of our classrooms to promote equality and civil discourse.
(NCSS-Cross-Disciplinary 1) [Cross-Disciplinary]
How “Great” was the Depression? Standard measures of unemployment and national income didn’t exist then. Learn differences between historical and modern economic measurements. Receive a free primary source lesson.
Eva Johnston
Jeannette Bennett
(NCSS-Global Studies 1) [Global Studies]
Explore ways to infuse sports in Canada, Mexico, and the USA to teach human/physical geography and economic concepts through inquiry. Receive strategies relating to major league teams and the 2026 World Cup.
Jennifer Dawson
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 1) [Curriculum and Instr]
Learn about the development process and K-12 curriculum materials to engage student learning about New Mexico’s Pueblo people in meeting challenges of federal and state policies.
Glenabah Martinez, Ph.D.
Natalie Martinez, Ph.D.
Shannon Romero
Azella Humetewa
(NCSS-Technology 1) [Technology]
Explore the challenges of keeping education resources “current,” from changing technology to evolving history, with a virtual panel on the newest Mission U.S. game about Japanese incarceration during World War II. Learn how to bring to life stories of diverse communities engaged in resistance at key turning points in our history.
Kristina Kirtley
Leah Potter
Peter Mabli
Cathlin Goulding
(NCSS-Psychology) [Psychology]
Increase civic engagement while reinforcing important psychological concepts. Come away with activities and resources to increase your psychology students’ participation in their community at the local, state, and national level.
Kristin Myers
Erica Bray-Parker
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 4) [Curriculum and Instr]
Want to ignite curiosity, active learning, empathy and involvement in your middle schoolers? Picture books can capture students' attentions and emotions at any grade and vocabulary levels. Explore resources and activities that can be used for face-to-face or online instruction.
Susan Santoli
Karen Morrison
Paige Vitulli
Susan DuBose
(NCSS-Elementary 2) [Elementary]
Explore a lesson introducing elementary students to all we do not know about Sacagawea and inviting them into a conversation about how historians draw conclusions from limited evidence.
Alison Schmitke
Leilani Sabzalian
(NCSS-World History) [World History]
Participate in and learn multiple strategies when teaching about the Nanjing atrocities and receive a packet with rich primary documents.
Christian Pirlet
Jing Williams
Mary Johnson
(NCSS-Elementary 1) [Elementary]
It’s been a messy, nasty political year. Inspire the next generation of public servants: explore ways of teaching civics that encourage bipartisanship, leadership, and respect. Encourage students to build bridges. Learn with visuals and audio excerpts and receive links to resources.
(NCSS-US History 1) [US History]
Engage with strategies to integrate primary and secondary sources representing diverse voices in American History, leveraging library databases.
Anthony Sievert
(NCSS-Curriculum & Instruction 2) [Curriculum and Instr]
Learn how to apply the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) to the Inquiry Design Model to create fully accessible and inclusive social studies inquiries for students with disabilities.
Kari Muente
Darren Minarik
Timothy Lintner
3:30pm - 4:00pm
(NCGE-3) [Geography]
The analysis of cultural landscapes is a key geographic skill. Learn how to use pictures in the classroom that focus on students analyzing information regarding the culture of a place.- Alison Cecil, duPont Manual High School, Louisville, KY
(NCGE-1) [Geography]
Reinvigorate geographic awareness with a habitat box exchange. Students compare evidence of their local natural environment to samples received from a different bioregion, improving observation and inquiry.- Tim Thomas, James Madison Unviversity, Harrisonburg, VA
(NCGE-4) [Geography]
American Indian Studies is a new elective offered by Winston-Salem Forsyth County Schools. In developing the framework for this class, a variety of sources were collected to guide students as they apply geographic tools to understand American Indian societies over time. These materials, along with teaching strategies, will be shared.- Amber Sluder, Middle College of Forsyth, Winston-Salem, NC
(NCGE-5) [Geography]
The Delaware Center for Geographic Education is partnering with GIS faculty and practitioners for its new outreach program that is expanding student knowledge of geospatial science career opportunities and training future geospatial scientists.- Mary Schorse, University of Delaware, Newark, DE
(NCGE-6) [Geography]
Learn how to guide students in a cultural geography field work activity where they practice reading the landscape of their hometown.
Suzanne Dickens
(NCGE-2) [Geography]
Explore the available resources the Arizona Geographic Alliance has to offer. These resources can be accessed online, used by everyone, and are free.- Heather Moll, Arizona Geographic Alliance, Tempe, AZ
4:00pm - 4:30pm
(NCGE-3) [Geography]
Explore the intersection of key population and development topics utilizing new, free teacher-developed units that focus on Korea as a rich case study to increase student inquiry and understanding.- Alison Cecil, duPont Manual High School, Louisville, KY
(NCGE-4) [Geography]
Incorporate APHG course skills using primary materials. Try sample lessons and create your own activities using the updated National Atlas of Korea to include international data in all of your units.- Doug Andersen, Oak Canyon Junior High School, Linden UT
(NCGE-1) [Geography]
Connect your geography teaching to geo-computational thinking, a skill for 21st century geographers. No computers required! We’ll use a familiar lesson in a new way to show how it’s done.- Juli Oltman, Thomas C. Hammond, Lehigh University, Lehigh, PA; Meghan Manfra, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
(NCGE-4) [Geography]
Explore the Japan Disasters Digital Archive (JDA) and its integration into the classroom, including the AP Human Geography course.- Anthony J. Zanin, Hutto ISD, Hutto, TX; Thomas Mueller, California University of Pennsylvania, California, PA
4:30pm - 5:00pm
(NCGE-1) [Geography]
Excite students by integrating maps, drones, Play-doh, and Legos to form the basis of a geographic inquiry project. Students then suggest improvements to a local park, based on their inquiry.
5:00pm - 5:30pm
(NCGE-1) [Geography]
Excite your students about archaeology. Students research current sites, investigate challenges to these sites, write and perform Site videos, and utilize Google MyMaps to display and share information.- Cynthia Bloom, Michigan Geographic Alliance, Kalamazoo, MI

 


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